All posts by Laura

Laura is Nora Roberts' personal publicist. She can be found on the Nora Roberts and JD Robb Official Fan Pages on Facebook as well as on Instagram.

BookChat: TRIBUTE/3

It’s scary sometimes how many times I pause over some dialogue or description before choosing something for the graphic (I could just spend the day rereading). Today I kept coming back to Ford’s fluency in sarcasm, though. Just love that faintly skewed flirtation underlying the entire conversation. Are you more inclined to appreciate smart sarcasm or a very direct approach?

Faithless in Death

Yes, this is months away, but in this uncertain world, isn’t it nice to know we can rely on JD Robb for two books a year? This is the title of the first of two 2021 In Deaths.

Some pre-order links are live — we’ll add to the list as more come online. International pre-orders will go live in a few months. And yes, it will be available in all formats.

TTP: https://bit.ly/3agfyYB
IndieBound: https://bit.ly/3ce0U5p
Amazon: https://amzn.to/3cfWtqY
BN: TK
BAM: TK
Kindle: https://amzn.to/2V5Smbh
Nook: TK
Apple: https://apple.co/3ejNvKY
Kobo: https://bit.ly/2XyEA2q
Google: https://bit.ly/3cjFcgB

Laura

BookChat: Tribute/1

This go round for the Fall Into the Story BookChat our book is Tribute. And we’ll be trying something different this time. I’m setting this up to be simultaneous with our Tribute chat on Facebook. I’ll post a graphic with a question about Tribute each day in their own, numbered post. That should make it easy to follow.

I’m still figuring this format for the blog out, so if you have any suggestions (helpful is most appreciated), post them in the comments.

If you haven’t read (or reread) Tribute, here’s the book description:

Cilla McGowan, a former child star, has found a more satisfying life restoring homes. So she comes to Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley to save the dilapidated farmhouse of her grandmother—a legendary actress who died of an overdose there more than thirty years ago.
 
Plunging into the project with gusto, Cilla’s almost too busy and exhausted to notice her neighbor, graphic novelist Ford Sawyer. Determined not to carry on the family tradition of ill-fated romances, Cilla steels herself against Ford’s quirky charm, though she can’t help indulging in a little fantasy.   
 
But it’s reality that holds its share of dangers for Cilla. A cache of unsigned letters found in the attic points to a mysterious romance in her grandmother’s life, and may be what sparks a frightening, violent assault. Now, if Cilla and Ford are unable to sort out who is targeting her and why, she may, just like her world-famous grandmother, be cut down in the prime of her life.

Here’s the first graphic, when Cilla meets Ford. I liked his instinctive protection of the rundown house and property. And Cilla’s direct questions.

Laura

Birthright Week 2

Time for a second week of Birthright discussion! Do you like this book chat idea? Do you feel you need a new post per discussion prompt or are you ok with five prompts during the week? Any and all feedback is welcome as we figure this out!

MARCH 30: I do like a man with a plan. And Jake is full of them, isn’t he?  I enjoyed their rhythm in work and conversation. You?

MARCH 31: I’m not sure how to describe my reaction to these lines. Sympathy for everyone involved is at the forefront, especially for Callie who is so pulled in many emotional directions.

APRIL 1 — Doug was so impatient and brusque when we met him, but these few lines gave him all my sympathy. So torn between past and present.

APRIL 2 — Courtship banter, Doug and Lana style. 

APRIL 6 — for some reason I missed Friday! Sorry about that.
Lana’s observation is on the nose, but it’s fun to watch Callie and Jake wind around to the same conclusion together (we know they did separately).

APRIL 7: When her mothers meet, we see how nature AND nurture made Callie the woman she is.

APRIL 8: Dialogue always draws me in (can’t you tell with the quotes?). I loved how Lana flirted with Doug, from the start.

APRIL 10 Last graphic from Birthright. We’ll close with a declaration of love, Jake-style.

Laura

Book Chat: Birthright

Time to start a new adventure: Book Chats here on the blog.

You’ll have to bear with me as I figure out the best ways to do this. For now, I’ll add a different graphic to this post Monday through Friday (and if we need more, I’ll make it so).

The first book is Birthright. If you haven’t read it in a while here’s the quick summary:

When five-thousand-year-old human bones are found at a construction site in the small town of Woodsboro, the news draws archaeologist Callie Dunbrook out of her sabbatical and into a whirlwind of adventure, danger, and romance.

While overseeing the dig, she must try to make sense of a cloud of death and misfortune that hangs over the project-fueling rumors that the site is cursed. And she must cope with the presence of her irritating-but irresistible-ex-husband, Jake. Furthermore, when a stranger claims to know a secret about her privileged Boston childhood, she is forced to question her own past as well.

MARCH 23: First conversation point:  Is there anything you love — even with any discomforts — as much as Callie loves archaeology? 

MARCH 24: Lana and Tyler Campbell are the first locals Callie meets in Woodsboro. Not sure I like Callie’s philosophy about kids or her immediate nickname for Tyler more. You?

MARCH 25: Doug Cullen considering how and why his family unraveled so completely. The hard part of these sentences is you can feel for everyone involved. 

MARCH 26: I love a book in which I can’t wait to see what everyone is doing. For Birthright, watching Lana court Doug was so much fun.  Are there secondary characters you’ve rooted on as much as you did the main couple?

MARCH 27: And then Jake Graystone swaggers on the page with his smug walk (Callie’s words). Here we have an example of Love Talk, Callie and Jake style. What appealed to you about Jake?

Laura

Be Strong, Stay Safe

This is a terrible and scary time. Most of us have to stay in our homes, losing the freedom of movement and society we’ve all taken for granted, well, forever. But we give up that basic freedom for the good of all. For our families and friends and neighbors. For strangers we’ll never meet.

Not all of us can stay home and safe, and we need to thank all those on the front lines. The doctors, nurses, interns, the lab techs, cleaning services, maintenance people, support staff in hospitals and clinics everywhere.

They’re heroes.

The cops, the firefighters, the truck drivers and delivery people, the mail carriers and all who leave the safety of home to help and protect us are heroes.

We have staff at Vesta and Turn The Page and Gifts going to work on limited hours to provide food for take-out, on line ordering for books and other things that make life for those of us at home easier and more bearable. At FIT, our Renee is streaming yoga videos from her home to keep that connection, to offer ways to relax. Our inn staff is doing videos of room tours, and posting on FB to, again, keep that connection, offer something to help people get out of their own heads for just a little while.

Heroes.

The teachers doing their best to send out lesson plans, to keep our children from losing progress, to keep their minds occupied, more heroes.

The child care providers tending children so those medical and essential people can do their jobs, just more heroes.

For myself, staying home is natural to me—but . . . I miss my grandchildren, I miss spending a fun week with my girl pals. And, like all of us, I worry.

Kayla’s missing the best part of her senior year—her last chance to run competitively, her prom, her moment of walking across the stage for her diploma. And the trip we planned for this summer, taking her to Italy.

And this sweet, smart, strong young woman is handling these deep disappointments without complaint. She’s sad, but knows how lucky she is—she told me so—to have a home, to have internet, to have books and movies, a family right there.

She’s one of my heroes, too.

I mourn for Italy, one of my favorites places in the world. I have dear, dear friends in New York, and am sick what this virus is doing to a city I love. I have friends with underlying conditions, with elderly parents, with young children.

I light candles—that’s my way of sending out light and hope and strength.

I have my home, my work—plenty of food and alcoholic beverages. I work out daily—it helps gets me out of my head. I have books, I stream movies—and when watching the news gets too much, I switch on HGTV, or turn to a book or movie.

A kitchen view

When the weather warms, BW and I can do yard work, something we both enjoy. I hope we can get annuals to fill out the beds, but if not (after my sad) I can divide and plug perennials into empty spaces.

I walked around outside—it’s brisk but sunny out there today—and took pictures of blooming things. It helps remind me that seasons change, hope springs, and we have to look for beauty to find it even in horrible times.

The Tulip Magnolia

Last fall I sliced a tomato, stuck it in a pot. And today, I picked the first perfect little ripe tomato. I’m going to send it down the lane with Kayla—she’s bringing me a few back-up groceries after her mom gets to the store.

Tomato.

Yesterday I made chocolate chip cookies, so my treasures down the hill can have that little bit of love from me.

Later today we’re FaceTiming with Jason, Kat and Griffin. They send pictures and videos, and I gobble them up every day.

This virus is a bastard, and we all have to take it very seriously. We have to protect each other. I hope you, too, can find little things to do to help push away the worry for awhile. Spring cleaning, crafting, books, movies, keeping in touch with friends and family, playing games, baking, whatever works. Do something to ease your mind while you stay safe and strong.

I read a story about a young man who heard an elderly couple in the grocery store say there was no more bread. He told them to take the loaf he had in his cart. Heroism can be just that simple.

Social distancing doesn’t mean we stop caring. It shows we care enough to give up those freedoms, that movement, those activities to protect others.

This is long and rambling, but heartfelt. Stay safe, wash your hands (We’re going through soap and lotion like crazy here!), be loving enough to keep your distance so we can all hug again one day.

I’m lighting candles for all of you.

Nora


Note from Laura: With so many people away from their regular routines, I think this is the right week to start the FITS book discussions. I will start a post with the first graphic and add to it as the week passes (like I do with the teasers for the In Deaths). I’ll be using graphics some of you may have seen on Facebook because I have a backlog of them.

The first book we’ll discuss is Birthright. Look for a Monday morning post.

I’m saving my particular sanity with walks and photos every day. If you like to look at calming scenery, you’ll see them at https://www.instagram.com/lmreeth/

Frederick MD skyline.